This page provides answers to the most common questions asked by parents about homeschooling. Be sure to visit the AZ LAW page to familiarize yourself with Arizona Revised Statutes relating to home education.  

Quick Links: Be sure to click on the icons below to be taken the specific page location of each category! 

Getting Started

Testing

Graduation & Diplomas

Homeschooling & ESA

Homeschool Definition:

HOW IS A HOMESCHOOL DEFINED IN ARIZONA?
ARS §15-802 G 2. Homeschool means a nonpublic school conducted primarily by the parent, guardian or other person who has custody of the child or nonpublic instruction provided in the child’s home.
Homeschoolers are parents or legal guardians who choose to educate their own children at home in at least the required subjects of reading, grammar, math, science, and social studies pursuant to A.R.S. §15-802. Read more on the AZ LAW page.

How Do I Get Started?

HOW DO I REGISTER MY CHILD?
Complete an Affidavit of Intent to Homeschool. Have it notarized. Make a photocopy for your records. Mail the original signed and notarized Affidavit to your County School Superintendent’s office along with proof of birth. The County will mail the original birth certificate (or other proof of birth) back to you once they have made a photocopy. Or you may hand deliver the affidavit and birth certificate to the County School Superintendent’s office, where they will receive and file your affidavit and make a photocopy of the birth certificate, returning the original to you.

WHERE DO I GET AN AFFIDAVIT OF INTENT TO HOMESCHOOL?
You can print an Affidavit of Intent to Homeschool in pdf format from the AZ LAW page.

WHEN DO I NEED TO FILE THE AFFIDAVIT OF INTENT TO HOMESCHOOL?
The Affidavit of Intent to Homeschool must be filed within 30 days of starting homeschooling for children ages 6-16. You may delay the start of formal education of your child until age 8 by noting so on the affidavit. If you decide to delay formal education until age 8, you would still file the affidavit with the County when your child turns 6.

WHAT IF I AM REMOVING MY CHILD FROM A PUBLIC OR PRIVATE SCHOOL?
There is no formal process or specific form that must be completed, but we recommend that you notify your child’s school principal or administration in writing that you will be removing your child to educate them at home.

DO I NEED TO JOIN A HOMESCHOOL ORGANIZATION?
You are not required to join any organization in order to homeschool. However, there are several that may be beneficial to you.

  1. AFHE (Arizona Families for Home Education) – By joining the state homeschool organization, you will be kept abreast of legislative issues that may affect homeschoolers in Arizona as well as other helpful information in the quarterly magazine Homeschool Arizona and periodic email updates sent to AFHE members who subscribe to our email list. Your AFHE membership supports an organization that serves Arizona homeschoolers all year long and is actively watching legislation that may affect homeschool freedom in our great state.
  2. HSLDA (Home School Legal Defense Association) – Members of HSLDA receive professional legal representation to protect the right to homeschool. HSLDA also acts as a voice for homeschooling families nationwide and monitors all state legislation that could reduce our homeschooling freedoms. AFHE members receive a discount on their HSLDA membership.
  3. Local Support Group membership is a great way to connect with other homeschooling families in your area, to share ideas, to encourage, edify and equip one another in the incredible homeschooling journey. AFHE maintains a list of homeschool support groups statewide as a reference. Please visit the SUPPORT GROUPS page to see what groups are available in your area.

HOW DO I FIND CURRICULUM?
There is an abundance of curricular resources available. You can search the Internet, talk to other homeschoolers, and attend the annual home education convention hosted by AFHE. At the convention you can browse the exhibit hall and attend vendor workshops to learn more about their products.

IDENTIFY YOUR CHILD’S LEARNING STYLE – It is helpful to spend some time observing your child to identify the way they learn best (auditory, visual, hands-on, etc.). There are many books on the market that can help you do this. The Way They Learn by Cynthia Ulrich Tobias is a good example. Identifying your child’s learning style can help you choose the best curricula for your child.

TALK TO OTHER HOMESCHOOLERS – Talk to parents who have been homeschooling awhile. Talk to parents who have children similar to yours. Ask them what works well for them and why. Ask them what they have tried that they didn’t like and why.

BE WILLING TO TRY DIFFERENT THINGS – It is important to understand that there may be some “trial and error” involved in choosing curriculum that will work well for your individual children and your family. This flexibility and ability to customize your student's program are great advantages of homeschooling!

READ HOMESCHOOL GUIDES – Read books that describe various curricula and resources such as Mary Pride’s Complete Guide to Homeschooling series, Cathy Duffy’s 102 Top Picks for Homeschool Curriculum: Choosing the Right Curriculum for Your Child, and Carol Barnier’s The Big WHAT NOW Book of Learning.

WHAT SUBJECTS DO I HAVE TO TEACH?
In Arizona, we are required by law to provide instruction in at least the subjects of reading, grammar, mathematics, science, and social studies. What you specifically teach for each subject, when you teach it, and at what pace you move through the material is up to you as your child’s teacher.

WHAT ABOUT STANDARDIZED TESTING?
In Arizona, there is no standardized testing requirement for homeschooled students (including the AzMERIT test). It is up to the individual parent/family whether or not to do standardized testing. One benefit to doing periodic standardized testing is that it gives your students practice taking norm-referenced tests. It can also give you a reliable measure of your child’s performance as compared with other students their age throughout the nation .Other means of evaluation include curriculum-specific tests and daily observation. One-on-one interaction between parent and child shows a parent how well their child is learning a specific body of knowledge and skills. If you wish to have your child take a standardized test, check with your local homeschool support group to see if they offer testing. If they do not, there are several vendors offering testing materials that you can purchase. Additional information on testing can be found on the Homeschooling FAQ page under TESTING.

HOW LONG SHOULD WE SPEND DOING SCHOOL EACH DAY?
It takes less time than you may think, especially in the elementary years. In the one-on-one tutorial setting of a homeschool, seatwork can be completed in a relatively short amount of time. This leaves plenty of room in the day for creative play, experiments, projects, exploration, reading, music, time with friends, and much more. Remember, homeschooling is more than an educational option, it is a way of life. Learning doesn’t take place only when your child is doing a workbook. True learning can take place all day, everyday, and in every activity.

WHAT ABOUT SOCIALIZATION?
This is often the first question homeschoolers are asked. If you look in the dictionary, one definition of socialize is “to make fit for companionship with others; make sociable.” Many homeschoolers have discovered healthy socialization takes place when children are exposed to people of all ages in various settings, not limited to the confines of a classroom and a group of students all about the same age. Children can learn to socialize in everyday activities such as a trip to the grocery store or library, play dates with friends, visits with grandparents, support group activities, park days, etc. Most importantly, children often receive their most valuable socialization in the nurturing environment of home and family.

Arizona has a very vibrant, active homeschool community. A challenge many homeschoolers encounter is dealing with the overabundance of activities available to us. One job we have as homeschooling parents is to look for activities that enhance our homeschool journey without leading to the frenzied distraction of too many outside activities. Learning to say “no” to the “good” and the “better” things, we leave room in our schedules for the “best.”

Testing

This section answers questions about standardized testing, college entrance examinations, and the GED.

Standardized Testing FAQs

WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF STANDARDIZED TESTING?
Periodic testing gives your students practice taking norm-referenced “fill-in-the-bubble” tests. It can provide a reliable measure of your child’s performance as compared with other students their age throughout the nation.

IS MY HOMESCHOOL CHILD REQUIRED TO TAKE STANDARDIZED TESTS?
No. In Arizona, there is no standardized testing requirement for homeschooled students including the AzMERIT test (formerly the AIMS test). It is up to the individual parent/family whether or not to do standardized testing through a private source. If you wish to have your child take a standardized test, check with your local homeschool support group to see if they offer testing. If they do not, there are several vendors offering testing materials that you can purchase.

ARE THERE OTHER WAYS TO EVALUATE MY CHILD'S PROGRESS?
Daily observation as well as tests found in your child’s curriculum are two excellent means of monitoring and evaluating your student’s progress. Through the one-on-one interaction between parent and child, a parent observes how well their child is learning a specific body of knowledge and skills.

IF I DECIDE TO HAVE MY CHILD TAKE A STANDARDIZED TEST, WHERE DO I GO?
Standardized tests are available for purchase by homeschooling families through independent suppliers.

A number of local homeschool support groups across Arizona do offer testing in the spring for their member families. If you wish to have your child take a standardized test, check with your local homeschool support group to see if they offer testing. Covenant Home School Resource Center in Phoenix also offers testing in the spring.

There are several resources offering testing materials. A few of them include:
Bayside School Services
Bob Jones University Press
Catforms Testing Service
Family Learning Organization
Hewitt Homeschool Resources – PASS Test
Piedmont Education Services
Seton Testing Service
Triangle Education Assessments

CAN MY CHILD TAKE A STANDARDIZED TEST THROUGH THE LOCAL PUBLIC SCHOOL OR SCHOOL DISTRICT?
AFHE does not recommend that homeschooled students take the AzMERIT test (formerly the AIMS test). There is no benefit for a homeschooled student to take this exam.
UNDERSTANDING THE HISTORY OF HOMESCHOOL STUDENTS AND STANDARDIZED TESTING IN ARIZONA
January 25, 2007: AFHE Response to Maricopa County Superintendent's Offer of AIMS Testing

On January 22, 2007 The Arizona Republic reported that a letter had been sent to all parents of students for whom their office has registered an Affidavit of Intent to Homeschool in Maricopa County. This letter invited parents to bring their children voluntarily to their Central Avenue office for AIMS testing in late February extending through April 2007.

AFHE discourages parents from accepting this offer for the following reasons:

1) A.R.S. 15-745(a) states: “Nothing in this article shall be construed to require the testing of children who are instructed in a homeschool program while they are receiving homeschool instruction.” You are not required by law to take the AIMS test. Many home educators do privately test their children to help them plan their curriculum goals. Our website has links to private testing resources. We encourage parents to use these tests for their evaluation purposes.

2) Maricopa County School Superintendent’s office has no accommodation so that parents may pay for the cost of this testing directly. Therefore, using this service is at a cost to the taxpayers. Entangling private home education with taxpayer money will inevitably lead to loss of freedom to home school. No assurance that the testing results will be the sole property of the parents is made with this offer. Whether another governmental agency may obtain access to the information is not clear. Any service has attendant costs and this test is no different such as costs of creation, printing, administration, proctoring and grading.

3) In the 1990’s, AFHE successfully shepherded legislation that resulted in A.R.S. 15-745. We won the right to be free from mandatory testing as home educators and placed the decision regarding testing in the control of parents. We believe that if parents voluntarily submit to this offer of “free” testing it will reopen the debate over mandatory testing once again. We ask that those secured rights be valued and protected by all who enjoy the freedom to homeschool in our state.

4) The assertion that colleges are requiring the AIMS test is inaccurate. AFHE works with all three state universities and they accept homeschooled students based upon an SAT or ACT score and a carefully prepared transcript that details the high school course of study. As far as out-of-state colleges, the AIMS test is an Arizona instrument only.

AFHE has always had an excellent relationship with our Maricopa County School Superintendent, Dr. Sandra Dowling and her dedicated staff. We understand their belief that they must offer this service. However, we must agree to disagree on the wisdom of homeschooling parents availing themselves of this offer, citing our concerns listed above.

—AFHE Board of Directors

SAT FAQs

WHEN SHOULD MY CHILD TAKE THE SAT?
Most often the SAT is taken during the spring of the Junior year. However, it can be taken earlier as practice if desired.

WHERE DOES MY HOMESCHOOLED CHILD TAKE THE SAT?
The SAT is taken through a local public or private high school that offers this test. Testing dates and locations can be found at collegeboard.com.

HOW DO I REGISTER MY STUDENT TO TAKE THE SAT?
Go to collegeboard.com for registration information.

WHAT IS THE HOMESCHOOL HIGH SCHOOL CODE FOR THE SAT?
970000

WHICH TEST SHOULD MY STUDENT TAKE - the SAT or ACT?
Check with the colleges your student is interested in attending to find out which test that institution prefers. The ACT covers Science, Math, Reading, and Language with an optional essay portion. The SAT has three parts: Reading, Math, and Writing & Language.

GED FAQs

Taking the GED can be a controversial issue in the homeschool community. A diploma earned by taking the GED tends to carry the stigma of indicating a “high school dropout.” It is not necessary for a homeschooled student to get an accredited diploma and it isn’t generally recommended to get the GED.

In Arizona, one must be age 18 or older to take the GED test. For homeschooled students between the ages of 16 and 18, verification that they have withdrawn their Affidavit of Intent to Homeschool must be provided. Rules for taking the GED in Arizona can be found on the Arizona Department of Education website.

PSAT FAQs

WHEN SHOULD MY CHILD TAKE THE PSAT?
The PSAT is taken in October of the student’s Junior year.

WHERE DOES MY HOMESCHOOLED STUDENT TAKE THE PSAT?
The PSAT is taken through a local public or private high school that offers this test. Testing dates and locations can be found at collegeboard.org.

HOW DO I REGISTER MY STUDENT TO TAKE THE PSAT?
Go to collegeboard.com for registration information.

WHAT IS THE ARIZONA STATE HOME SCHOOL CODE FOR THE PSAT?
990 399

Test Preparation FAQs

WHEN SHOULD MY STUDENT TAKE THE ACT?
Most often the ACT is taken during the spring of the Junior year. However, it can be taken earlier as practice if desired.

WHERE DOES MY STUDENT TAKE THE ACT?
The ACT is taken through a local public or private high school that offers this test. Testing dates and locations can be found at actstudent.org.

HOW DO I REGISTER MY STUDENT TO TAKE THE ACT?
Go to actstudent.org for registration information.

WHAT IS THE HOMESCHOOL HIGH SCHOOL CODE FOR THE ACT?
969-999

WHICH TEST SHOULD MY STUDENT TAKE - the SAT or ACT?
Check with the colleges your student is interested in attending to find out which test that institution prefers. The ACT covers Science, Math, Reading and Language with an optional essay portion. The SAT has three parts: Reading, Math and Writing & Language.

WHAT SHOULD MY STUDENT DO TO PREPARE FOR THE SAT OR ACT?
Purchase study books and take practice tests from collegeboard.org or actstudent.org. Local bookstores and online bookstores also carry study books and practice tests for the PSAT, SAT, ACT, and GED.

HOW DO I FIND OUT WHICH TEST MY STUDENT SHOULD PREPARE FOR?
Contact the college admissions office to find out their entrance requirements.

WHAT ABOUT COMMUNITY COLLEGE ADMISSIONS?
Each community college has a testing center where they administer their own entrance exam. Contact the community college directly for admissions requirements and testing information.

WHERE CAN I FIND MORE INFORMATION ABOUT TESTING?
Visit the HSLDA website for additional information about testing: hslda.org/highschool/testing.asp.  

Graduation & Diplomas

This FAQ answers questions about diplomas and graduate recognition ceremonies.
HOW DOES MY HOMESCHOOLED CHILD RECEIVE A DIPLOMA?
The parent of a homeschooled child is responsible for setting the graduation requirements, creating and maintaining their child’s transcript, and issuing the diploma. AFHE does not issue diplomas or validate your homeschool diploma.

IS A HOMESCHOOLED STUDENT'S DIPLOMA ACCREDITED?
No, it is not. The homeschooling parent accepts responsibility for issuing a diploma and certifying the student’s status as a graduate. Thorough documentation of a student’s academic record on a transcript supports the diploma.

WHERE CAN I PURCHASE A DIPLOMA?
There are a number of vendors that carry diplomas and graduation supplies for homeschooled students. A couple of them include HSLDA and Homeschool Diploma. HSLDA offers a beautiful form in a leatherette case with an attractive gold seal at an economical price. Homeschool Diploma has personalized diplomas and diploma covers, other graduation supplies, and ideas to help you make this a special time for your graduate. The parent signs the diploma.

IS THERE A GRADUATION CEREMONY FOR HOMESCHOOLED GRADUATES?
AFHE sponsors an annual statewide Graduate Recognition Ceremony for homeschooled seniors each year. The AFHE Senior High Graduate Recognition Ceremony is a very reverent, formal cap and gown ceremony that commemorates the achievement of the students and their parents. Visit the Graduation Page for more information about this ceremony.

In addition, a number of homeschool support groups across Arizona hold a graduation ceremony for their member families.

DOES AFHE VALIDATE A HOMESCHOOLED STUDENT'S DIPLOMA?
No. AFHE does not validate or certify that a homeschooled student has completed their high school coursework.

DOES AFHE OFFER A GRADUATION CEREMONY FOR JUNIOR HIGH STUDENTS?
At this time AFHE does not offer a junior high graduation ceremony.

SHOULD MY CHILD TAKE THE GED?
Taking the GED can be a controversial issue in the homeschool community. There is a stigma attached to the GED because of its association with high school dropouts. However, it is a fairly easy process and there are a number of post secondary education programs, such as trade schools, that require a homeschooled student to have an accredited diploma or GED rather than accepting the student’s homeschool high school transcript. See GED section above in the Testing FAQ for more information.

WHERE CAN I GET MORE INFORMATION ABOUT HOMESCHOOLING THROUGH HIGH SCHOOL?
HSLDA offers a wealth of information to encourage parents as they teach their children all the way through high school. Visit their website at hslda.org/highschool. At AFHE's annual statewide convention you can attend numerous workshops dedicated to equipping and helping you in this worthwhile and exciting work. Recordings of previous workshops can be purchased for download from Resounding Voice. Search their store for AFHE to find our workshops.

FAQs Regarding Homeschooling and the Empowerment Scholarship Account

IS AFHE GOING TO RELEASE A STATEMENT REGARDING THE EXPANSION OF THE ESA PROGRAM?
On June 30, 2022, an initial statement was sent to our entire email list, put on the blog and AFHE website, and on our social media pages. We worked closely with HSLDA during this time, and their statement was emailed to their members on July 5, 2022.


On August 29, 2022, an additional AFHE Statement was released to answer further questions.  Click here to view the statement.

WHAT IS AFHE'S POSITION REGARDING THE NEW ESA LAW?
AFHE does not oppose nor endorse the ESA expansion. AFHE believes it is the right of all Arizona parents to seek out the educational options that are best for their children. As always, AFHE encourages parents to do their best research regarding educational options and understand the choice that they make. We believe in your right to do so. The AZ Law and Affidavit page on our website lists laws pertaining to Arizona’s homeschool freedom and protections. We will continue protecting Arizona’s homeschool law and homeschool liberty as our top priority.

WHY IS AFHE SO COMMITTED TO HOMESCHOOL FREEDOM? 
AFHE stands for homeschooling as defined in Arizona law, recognizing that definitions include boundaries. When AFHE was established in 1983, there was not a definition of homeschooling in our state’s law. AFHE’s founders sought to firmly establish the right of parents to educate their children in the manner of their choosing, free from government regulation, oversight, or approval. AFHE worked through the legislature to develop the legally defined classification of homeschool in Arizona law over the course of about thirteen years in the 1980s and 1990s. The current homeschool definition in ARS § 15-802(G)(2) was established in 2011. Seeking and protecting this freedom has always been AFHE’s prime directive. We believe that all Arizona parents benefit from the efforts of AFHE and other organizations in Arizona who seek to protect parental rights and the freedom to educate their children as they choose.

DOES AFHE WORK WITH HSLDA?
 
We continue to work very closely with HSLDA, speak with them on a regular basis, and consistently attend each other’s events. Together, both AFHE and HSLDA are dedicated to promoting and protecting homeschooling in Arizona. AFHE also partners regularly with other state and local groups who work hard for parental and educational freedoms.

CAN ESA FAMILIES JOIN AFHE?  

AFHE does not bar any group from attending our annual convention or being a member. Many families who are considering homeschooling, want to learn more about homeschooling, are supporters of AFHE, or just want great content are members of AFHE and/or attend our convention. Anything we can do to help parents or families move closer to parent-directed, privately funded homeschooling will always be considered a win. There is a great deal of overlap between homeschooling and ESA contract education at home. This means that our annual convention, articles on our website, and many of the resources and opportunities we offer will be valuable and helpful to all families who educate at home. At the same time, our focus is homeschooling.

HOW WILL THE ESA EXPANSION AFFECT SUPPORT GROUPS AND CO-OPS? 
Participation in a local group or co-op is a great way to build friendships and enrich the home education experience. Each group is run independently and has its own requirements for membership, emphasis (Christian, secular, etc.), format, membership dues, area that it serves, etc. We encourage you to research groups you are interested in to make sure they are a good fit for your family. A listing can be found on the Resources page of the AFHE website.

WHAT ABOUT AFHE'S MISSION STATEMENT?   
AFHE’s mission statement states, in part, that AFHE exists to “support parents who choose a home-based education option for their children.” AFHE believes that with information on our website, with our magazine and other member benefits, with our events, and in many other ways we can support ANY parent and family that wishes to be more intentional about their child’s education, especially those who are educating at home. This in no way dilutes AFHE’s commitment to homeschool freedom.

CAN ESA FAMILIES PARTICIPATE IN AFHE'S GRADUATION CEREMONY?  
Under the ESA that existed prior to the 2022 expansion, ESA contract families who educated their children at home were limited to children with disabilities and other specific populations. Those numbers were relatively small, and since they educated at home, they were able to participate in the AFHE graduation and celebrate their accomplishment. Our policy remains that the AFHE graduation is for those who educate at home, whether it be homeschooling or ESA.

CAN ESA STUDENTS APPLY FOR AND OBTAIN SCHOLARSHIPS THROUGH AFHE?  
No. AFHE scholarships are limited to homeschool graduates.

IS AFHE OPPOSED TO PARENTS USING THE ESA CONTRACT TO EDUCATE THEIR CHILDREN AT HOME?  
We are thankful that in Arizona, we have the parental freedom to choose the type of education we want for our children. Parents are best qualified to determine how their children are educated. AFHE does not support nor oppose the signing of an ESA contract.

WHY DO YOU CALL THE EDUCATIONAL CHOICES IN ARIZONA "CLASSIFICATIONS"?

ARS § 15-802 includes the word "classification" in the title and goes on to describe five distinct classifications in Arizona. ARS § 15-802(A) says, "A person who has custody of the child shall choose a public, private or charter school or a homeschool as defined in this section to provide instruction or shall sign a contract to participate in an Arizona empowerment scholarship account pursuant to section 15-2402" (emphasis added). The repeated "or" indicates that the parent or guardian must choose one of these classifications. (Virtual charter, described in ARS § 15-808, is a type of charter school.)

IS A STUDENT WITH AN ESA CONTRACT EDUCATING AT HOME ALSO A HOMESCHOOL STUDENT?   
Not according to the legal definition of homeschool in Arizona, and not according to the Arizona Department of Education (https://www.azed.gov/sites/default/files/2022/08/H.B.%202853%20FAQ.pdf Q8: Can ESA funds be used for homeschooling? From 8/17/2022 version). However, it is understandable that this may be confusing. In Arizona, students who attend private school must file an affidavit of intent with the county school superintendent (ARS § 15-802(B)(2)). A parent of a homeschool student must file an affidavit of intent with the county school superintendent (ARS § 15-802(B)(2)). Under ARS § 15-2402(B)(5), a student who enters an ESA contract must not have an affidavit of intent to homeschool filed with the county office. Therefore, a student must have either public school enrollment, or charter school enrollment, or a private school affidavit, or a homeschool affidavit, or an ESA contract. What makes this confusing is that ESA contract students who choose to attend private school fit into two classifications. However, the homeschool affidavit and the ESA contract are mutually exclusive, as seen above and in ARS § 15-2402(I). In many ways, homeschooling students and ESA contract students educating at home will look the same in practice.

IS IT ACCURATE AND REASONABLE TO SAY THAT EDUCATION AT HOME WITH AN ESA CONTRACT IS NOT HOMESCHOOLING?   
The term homeschooling has been used for many years to generally describe education that happens at home. It is understandable to want to continue using the same word when a contract and funding source are the only apparent differences. But in the public sphere it is important to use legally defined terms. To the best of our ability, when the term homeschool is used by AFHE it means as defined in the Arizona Revised Statutes.

WHAT IS THE INTENT AND HISTORY OF THE TERM "NONPUBLIC" AS RELATED TO HOMESCHOOL IN THE ARS?   
AFHE, HSLDA, and the homeschooling movement in general have had a long-standing value that homeschools should receive no public funds. In many instances in the United States, taxpayer funding has led to regulations. Privately funded homeschool is the maximum freedom option. In 2011, the word "nonpublic" was included in the homeschool definition in ARS 15-802(G)(2) through the sustained efforts of AFHE with the intent to mean that homeschool would receive no public funds. This was done to differentiate homeschooling from various public school efforts to educate students in the home. This mirrored ARS § 15-802(G)(3), which stated that private schools were nonpublic institutions, and at that time they also received no public funds. The ESA was also enacted in Arizona in 2011 and included public funding. AFHE remains committed to homeschooling in Arizona being the maximum freedom option by not receiving any public funds directly or indirectly.

IS THE FUNDING SOURCE IMPORTANT TO FREEDOM?  
There are numerous instances throughout America and around the globe where government funding has provided a wedge by which social services, bureaucrats, and elected officials have inserted themselves into the home setting. This statement is not alarmist but is a simple observation: any time taxpayer dollars are provided for a designated purpose, increased regulation is applied and can be justified. For homeschooling to remain the educational option of maximum freedom, it must remain free of government funding. In fact, this characteristic of homeschooling has historically been one of its greatest strengths, allowing families to maintain the utmost independence, flexibility, and personal discretion in their educational methods, priorities, and choices.

WHAT ARE THE AT-HOME EDUCATIONAL CHOICES IN ARIZONA?  

In Arizona today, students can homeschool. ESA contract students can also be educated at home. Students can also attend public K-12 schools online at home, charter K-12 schools online at home, and private K-12 schools online at home. It is wonderful that we have so many freedoms in Arizona. Only homeschooling is defined legally as nonpublic and education conducted by the parent and/or in the home.https://hslda.org/